Dating and marriage in the victorian era

Posted by / 07-Mar-2019 17:58

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the primary objective of human resource management (HRM), how it fits within an organization, ethics, and study its history; categorize the Classical Scientific School of Management and Fayol's theories on worker satisfaction and staff management; analyze the definition of job design and how empowerment and job design are connected; review hiring and staffing, recruitment, common selection methods, how to assess an organization's training needs, and find out about the different types and methods of employee training programs and new hire orientation; examine the benefits and uses of appraisals, performance appraisal types, and the uses of reliability and validity in assessment; compare and contrast direct and indirect compensation, common compensation systems, compensation equity, and mandatory and voluntary benefits; explain at-will employment, privacy, work-life balance, workplace stress, wage and income regulations, and safety; outline the history and purpose of labor relations, including the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), collective-bargaining, unions, strikes, lockouts, the executive orders of 19, and labor relations trends; distinguish the four global staffing approaches and expatriate staffing; and illustrate what Affirmative Action is through workplace diversity, ability and disability diversity, cultural, and age diversity.

Topics include: overview of HRM field; personnel management; organizational theories and human resources; job analysis and design; staffing in organizations; training and development in organizations; performance appraisals; employee compensation issues; employment law and employee rights; labor relations; international human resource management; and current issues and trends in HRM.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and compare managerial accounting functions, processes and responsibilities; distinguish between cash management, auditing, and financial reporting methods; understand and define cost classifications and formulas, and calculate cost and profit analyses; evaluate cash flow, income statements, inventory and costing systems; describe the activity-based costing process; identify and distinguish between the components of budgets and standard cost evaluations; examine accounting reporting tools and reporting responsibilities; learn how to calculate, analyze and make decisions regarding costs, investments, budgeting, spending and cash flow; explain how financial statements, income statement, balance sheets and cash flow statements are prepared and used; and interpret and analyze various types of financial statements.

Major topics include: overview of managerial accounting; internal controls in accounting; cost types; cost behavior analysis and cost volume profit; job-order costing and process costing; basics of activity-based costing; budgeting and standard costs; reporting systems and structures in accounting; short and long-term decision-making in accounting; and basics of financial statement analysis.

Major topics include: application software; systems software; computer hardware; social impacts and history of computing; data communications; World Wide Web; networks access and architecture; software development; and programming methodology.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the history and appraise current state of the field of organizational behavior; compare and contrast how employees' attitudes affect an organization, including the impact of job satisfaction and absenteeism; categorize different types of diversity in the workplace and assess the effect diversity has on an organization; summarize the styles of communication used in different organizations; identify and distinguish the types of conflict and conflict resolution in the workplace; differentiate between the different types of organizations, including centralized and mechanistic; assess the effect of organizational culture on the workplace; evaluate factors that cause organizational change; and diagram and explain the process of career development.

Topics include: evolution of organizational behavior; personality and behavior in organizations; attitudes, perception and attribution in the workplace; employee motivation; individual decision making in organizations; workforce diversity; organizational communication in business; group and team dynamics; conflict in the workplace; management and leadership in organizational behavior; leadership styles in organizational behavior; organizational structure and design; job design; organizational culture; organizational change and organizational behavior; and career management.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the nature of business and entrepreneurship; evaluate how the economy, law, technology, competition, and society impact businesses and the global market; differentiate the forms and types of business ownership; summarize organizational management in terms of management and leadership levels, skills and roles; assess the importance of employee motivation and performance reviews; break down the cycle of business production and sales; investigate risk management through learning about ways to manage it and insurance coverage options; describe the role of money in business, including accounting, securities, and financial institutions; analyze the nature of business and entrepreneurship; evaluate how the economy, law, technology, competition, and society impact businesses and the global market; differentiate the forms and types of business ownership; summarize organizational management in terms of management and leadership levels, skills and roles; assess the importance of employee motivation and performance reviews; break down the cycle of business production and sales; investigate risk management through learning about ways to manage it and insurance coverage options; describe the role of money in business, including accounting, securities, and financial institutions. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons.

Topics include: the dynamic business environment, practicing social responsibility and ethical behavior in business, economics and business, business in global markets, forms of business ownership, entrepreneurship and small business, managing and leading in business, leadership styles in business, organizational management, business production and operations, workplace productivity and motivation, basics of human resources, managing the employer-worker relationship, business marketing basics, product development and retailing, product distribution and supply chain management, pricing strategy in marketing, product promotion in business, MIS basics in business, implications of information technology, risk management in business, accounting basics, financial management in business, securities markets and business, and money and financial institutions.

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